Curriculum Overview

Good Shepherd Episcopal School offers a traditional college preparatory K-8 program.  As an independent school, the faculty writes its own curriculum guide, using mainstream textbooks and other publications.

Lower school students receive a consistent experience in the Harcourt (HSB) math curriculum, with the middle school students using Houghton-Mifflin math materials.  Good Shepherd uses Houghton-Mifflin publications for a consistent approach in the lower grades English curriculum.  The Sadlier-Oxford vocabulary curriculum is used by middle school students and will be expanded to the other grade levels in 2018-2019.  Social studies courses are taught using the Studies Weekly curriculum for grades K and 1 and for Florida History.  Traditional textbooks are used for social studies and science at other grade levels.

Good Shepherd Episcopal School is diligent in offering music, art, foreign language, theology, and physical education, in keeping with the mind-body-spirit focus of the school’s mission.  Each class spends time in the computer lab most days, but the school also desires to limit the students’ screen time.

As a private school, Good Shepherd is not bound by state standards or Common Core requirements.  Standardized testing is kept to a minimum.  Even so, it is important that there be accountability in the academic program, thus Terra Nova (a nationally-normed achievement test) is administered the last week of April each year.

Lower School Curriculum

Kindergarten

Students in kindergarten participate in a variety of activities designed to begin a love of learning.  Through the use of theme-based learning, students will be presented with lessons that integrate language arts, math, science, and social studies.

Language arts instruction focuses on phonics, letter and sight word recognition, and an introduction to grammar rules.  Students will learn basic parts of speech and will begin to write simple sentences.

Math instruction emphasizes the importance of number sense and counting (by ones, fives, and tens).  Instruction also focuses on positional words, measurement, patterns, sequences, time, money, addition, and subtraction.  Students will create and maintain an interactive math notebook.  This notebook is used as a reference for students and as a tool to track progress.

Students will create and maintain an interactive notebook for science units as well.  This notebook will contain vocabulary and labs/activities for science lessons.  Students will participate in a class garden designed to teach several kindergarten science topics, including weather, basic needs, and roles of animals and plants.

Social studies readings are through the Florida Studies Weekly curriculum.  Through the use of student newspapers, associated leveled readers, and class discussion, students will explore topics such as citizenship, rights and responsibilities, needs and wants, and maps.

Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies
● Letters recognition

● Letter sounds

● Phonics

● Sight word recognition

● Decoding skills

● Rhyming

● Participation in discussions

●Comprehension (reading and listening)

     o   Inference

     o  Connections to text

     o   Summarizing

     o   Story elements

     o   Sequencing

● Brainstorming

● Sentence structure

     o   Capitalization

     o   Ending punctuation

     o   Spacing between words

● Connect sentences and pictures

● Print concepts

● Roles of author and illustrator

● Number recognition to 30

● Counting by 1, 5, and 10

● Positional words

● Patterning

●Measurement

● Greater than and less than

● Graphs and data

● Calendar

● Fractions

● Time

● Money

● Plane and solid shapes

● Addition and subtraction

●Weather and seasons

● Day and night

● Plants and animals

● Basic needs

● Food groups and basic nutrition

● Parts of the body

● Citizenship

● Needs and wants

● Maps

● American symbols and traditions

●Celebrations around the world

● Spending and saving

1st Grade

First grade builds a great deal on the basic skills learned in kindergarten.  Through the learning strategies acquired in kindergarten, students in first grade can apply previous skills to new concepts and ideas.

Language arts continues to focus on phonics skills as well as expanding on sight words.  Students will use these skills to demonstrate fluency and comprehension in their reading.  First grade students will also learn to write related sentences and to vary sentence structure.

Students will begin to work with numbers up to 100 in first grade.  Addition and subtraction, word problems, graphs and data, measurement, money, and time are concepts covered in first grade.

Students will use the scientific method to understand and complete labs associated with the Florida Studies Science curriculum.  Topics covered in this curriculum include weather, the water cycle, plants, animals, and rocks and minerals.

Social studies readings are through the Florida Studies Weekly curriculum.  This includes weekly newspapers, associated leveled readers, and class discussion.  Topics include timelines, citizenship, needs and wants, and American traditions and symbols.

 

Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies
● Decoding 

● Reading common sight words and expanding on sight word recognition

● Phonics

● Following written directions

● Reading and comprehending a variety of genres

     o   Connections to text

     o   Summarizing

     o   Inferring

     o   Predicting

● Parts of speech

     o   Nouns

     o   Verbs

     o   Adjectives

     o   Pronouns

● Sentence structure

● Writing responses

● Types of sentences

● Number sense to 100  

● Patterns

● Graphs and data

● Calendar and time

● Money

● Fractions

● Addition with regrouping

● Subtraction

● Measurement

● Scientific method  

● Plants and animals

● Basic needs

● Habitats

● Rocks and minerals

● Weather and water cycle

● Energy

● Conservation of natural resources

● Earth and other planets

● Citizenship  

● Needs and wants

● Timelines

● American symbols and traditions

● Celebrations around the world

● Map skills

● Community jobs

● Geography

● Leaders

2nd Grade

The curriculum for second grade reviews and reinforces concepts while moving into the next level of academic performance.  Research is assigned regularly, cursive writing is introduced, and the students are encouraged to accept increased responsibility for successful completion of their assignments.

In language arts, students focus on phonics, alphabetical order, compound and multi-syllable words, suffixes, prefixes, grammar, types of sentences, reference skills, vocabulary, creative writing, and the writing process.

Math instruction emphasizes an introduction to multiplication and division, three- and four-digit numbers, problem- solving, time, money, graphs and data, place value, regrouping, mental math, and measurements.

A note about science and social studies:

The 2nd and 3rd grade self-contained classroom teaches science and social studies on a two-year rotation.  All students learn the same material over their two years in the classroom but the sequence varies.

Physical, earth, and life sciences are taught.  Students will learn investigation skills, scientific tools, and the scientific process.  For physical science, students will focus on matter and how it changes, light, and energy.  In earth science, the students will learn about moon phases, natural resources, rocks and minerals, space and astronomy, and weathering.  Finally, in life science, students will learn about animal and plant life cycles, habitats, anatomy, and organisms.

Social studies classes focus on neighborhoods and communities, culture, and needs and wants.  Overviews of geography, basic economics, American history, and American government are included.

 

Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies
● Parts of speech      

o   Nouns

     o   Verbs

     o   Pronouns

     o   Adverbs

     o   Adjectives

● Sentences

● Spelling, vocabulary

● Punctuation

● Capitalization

● Contractions

● Synonyms, antonyms

● Genres

● Homophones

● Writing process

     o   Penmanship

     o   Brainstorming

     o   Paragraphs

     o   Revising

     o   Editing

● Time  

● Money

● Addition (2 and 3 digit

● Subtraction (2 and 3 digit)

● Multiplication

● Division

● Place value

● Measuring

● Data and graphs

● Probability

● Fractions

● Numbers

● Patterns

● Range and mode

● Angles

● Solid figures

● Plane figures

● Patterns

● Length, perimeter, area

● Weight, mass, capacity, temperature

Year A  

● Matter

● Light, heat, energy

● Motion, sound

● Earth’s surface

● Natural resources

● Weather

● Solar system

● Living, nonliving things

● Animals, plants

● Life, environment

Year B

● Properties of matter

● Energy, heat

● Forces and motion

● Work and machines

● Minerals, rocks

● Forces shaping land

● Water cycle

● Conservation

● Earth in Solar System

● Types of plants

● Types of animals

● Habitats

● Interdependency of living things

Year A 

● Neighborhoods

● Land, water

● Weather, climate

● Geography overview

● Cultures

● American symbols and holidays

● Needs and wants

● Goods and services

● Economics overview

● American history overview

● American government overview

Year B

● Communities

● Maps and features

● Culture

● Landforms

● Continents

● Oceans

● Hemispheres

● Glossary

● Goods and services

3rd Grade

The main academic goals for the third grade are the mastery of multiplication and division, cursive writing, the parts of speech, and the composition of the formal paragraph.  The development of responsibility and independent work habits is also a major focus of this grade level.

In language arts, students focus on grammar, quotation, written communication, note-taking, comparing and contrasting, spatial order, diagrams, reports and summarization, dialogue, cursive writing, study skills, oral language, and literature.

Math instruction emphasizes variables and equations, geometry, measurement, graphs and data, time, money, multiplication, division, rounding and estimation, fractions, and decimals.

A note about science and social studies:

The 2nd and 3rd grade self-contained classroom teaches science and social studies on a two-year rotation.  All students learn the same material over their two years in the classroom but the sequence varies.

Physical, earth, and life sciences are taught.  Students will learn investigation skills, scientific tools, and the scientific process.  For physical science, students will focus on matter and how it changes, light, and energy.  In earth science, the students will learn about moon phases, natural resources, rocks and minerals, space and astronomy, and weathering.  Finally, in life science, students will learn about animal and plant life cycles, habitats, anatomy, and organisms.

Social studies classes focus on neighborhoods and communities, culture, and needs and wants.  Overviews of geography, basic economics, American history, and American government are included.

 

Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies
● Parts of speech      

o   Nouns, proper nouns

     o   Verbs: helping, special, irregular, past, present, future

     o   Pronouns (subject and object)

     o   Adverbs

     o   Adjectives

● Subject, predicate

● Spelling

● Sentence fluency

● Homophones

● Contractions

● Abbreviations

● Genres

● Punctuation

● Capitalization

● Writing

     o   Penmanship

     o   Brainstorming

     o   Paragraphs

     o   Revising

     o   Editing

● Decimals  

● Fractions

● Graphs and data

● Estimation

● Rounding

● Probability

● Plane figures

● Line segments, angles

● Congruence, symmetry

● Solid figures

● Perimeter

● Area

● Time

● Money

● Multiplication

● Division

● Missing factors

● Multistep problems

● Factor pairs

● Expressions

● Equations

● Order of operations

Year A  

● Matter

● Light, heat, energy

● Motion, sound

● Earth’s surface

● Natural resources

● Weather

● Solar system

● Living, nonliving things

● Animals, plants

● Life, environment

Year B

● Properties of matter

● Energy, heat

● Forces and motion

● Work and machines

● Minerals, rocks

● Forces shaping land

● Water cycle

● Conservation

● Earth in Solar System

● Types of plants

● Types of animals

● Habitats

● Interdependency of living things

Year A  

● Neighborhoods

● Land, water

● Weather, climate

● Geography overview

● Cultures

● American symbols and holidays

● Needs and wants

● Goods and services

● Economics overview

● American history overview

● American government overview

Year B

● Communities

● Maps and features

● Culture

● Landforms

● Continents

● Oceans

● Hemispheres

● Glossary

● Goods and services

4th Grade

Fourth grade is a year of progress in reading, writing, and language arts. By the end of fourth grade language arts, students should be able to read with an increased level of fluency and expression and use root words, prefixes, suffixes, and context clues to analyze unfamiliar words. They will also recognize and be able to identify the eight parts of speech. They will apply comprehension strategies to literary and expository texts and formulate multiple paragraph pieces that focus on a specific purpose or audience.

Visible math skill development will also be noted in fourth grade. By the end of fourth grade math, students should be able to add and subtract large numbers with sums up to 1,000,000. They will be proficient at completing basic multiplication and division problems and they will understand basic fraction and decimal concepts. They will recognize and identify basic geometric vocabulary and ideas and be proficient in data collection and analysis.

The fourth grade science units focus on ecosystems, electricity and magnetism, and Earth. In life science the students will know that ecosystems are communities of organisms that interact with each other and their physical environment; basic interactions in ecosystems are food chains and food webs in which matter cycles and energy flows. In physical science, students will know that electricity and magnetism are related effects that have many useful applications in everyday life. Students will learn the role of electromagnets in the construction of electric motors and experience how electrical energy can be converted to heat, light, and motion.  In earth science students will know Earth changes and is shaped through slow and rapid processes. Through a series of hands-on investigations, students will experience the effects of weathering and erosion. Students will learn how to identify rocks and minerals by their properties.

The fourth grade social studies curriculum consists of Florida history, geography, economics, and civics. Students will learn about Florida focusing on exploration and colonization, growth, and the 20th Century and beyond. Students will study the important people, places, and events that helped shape Florida history.

 

Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies
● Reading – genres  

● Reading – recognition of:

     o   Context clues

     o   Main idea and supporting details

     o   Summarization

     o   Predictions

     o   Inferences

     o   Theme

     o   Conclusions

     o   Author’s purpose

● Brainstorming

● Organizing

● Paragraph and essay structure:

     o   Narrative

     o   Expository

     o   Persuasive

     o   Research-based

● Revision and editing – elaborating with:

     o   Word choice

     o   Details

     o   Sentence fluency

● Place value  

● Number sequencing

● Multiplying and dividing numbers

● Adding and subtracting fractions, decimals, and mixed numbers

● Order of operations

● Math properties

● Lines, points, rays

● Angles

● Plane figures

● Vertices

● Edges

● Faces

● Transformations

● Graphs and data: mean, median, mode

● Time

● Temperature

● Customary and metric measure

● Perimeter, area, volume

● Probability

 

Life science – Ecosystems 

● Biomes

● Animal adaptions

● Food chains

● Food webs

Physical science – Magnetism and Electricity

● Magnets

● Magnetic fields

● Static electricity

● Simple circuits

● Series circuits

● Parallel circuits

● Motors

Earth Science – The Changing Earth

● Rocks and minerals

● Weathering and erosion

Year A – Florida History 

● State symbols

● Government

● Geography

● Natives

● Explorers

● Spanish Florida

● English Florida

● Revolution

● Wars (Seminole, Civil, Spanish American)

● World Wars

 

● Modern Florida

Year B – U.S. History

 

● Geography

● First Americans

● Exploration

● Settlements

● Colonies

● Revolution: causes, war

● Creating nation

● Early republic

● Expansion

● Civil War: causes, battles, Reconstruction

● The Plains

● Business, industry, cities

● World power

● Current issues

5th Grade

Fifth grade is a year of steady progress in reading and language arts. By the end of fifth grade, students should be able to use grade appropriate vocabulary and work with the eight parts of speech. They will be able to apply comprehension strategies to a variety of literary genres and write and punctuate appropriately in composition assignments. They will speak and listen with grade appropriate skill.

In math, fifth graders will be proficient using the four math operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. They will use basic algebraic functions such as exponents and order of operations and apply geometric concepts to solve problems. They will use various methods of measurement with skill and understand data analysis and basic statistical terms.

Fifth grade science units consist of living systems, chemistry and matter, and the solar system. Life science focuses on transport systems in animals (respiratory, circulatory, digestive and excretory) and plants (roots, stems-xylem and phloem, leaves). By the end of the unit students will know the main idea that structure and function are related in living organisms. In physical science, students will learn that the elements and their combinations account for all the varied types of matter in the world, all matter is made of atoms, which may combine to form molecules, each element is made of one kind of atom and that the elements are organized in the periodic table by their chemical properties. In earth science, students will learn the main idea that, as the “water planet,” Earth is a unique structure and this function is relative to all living organisms. They will also know that the solar system consists of the sun (a star) and planets, and that the Earth is the only one with water.

In fifth grade social studies, students will use their understanding of social studies concepts and cause-and-effect relationships to study the development of the United States from pre-Columbian times to the present. By applying what they know from civics, economics and geography, students learn the ideals, principles, and systems that shaped this country’s founding.

 

Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies
● Reading – genres  

● Reading – recognition of:

     o   Context clues

     o   Main ideas and supporting details

     o   Summarization

     o   Predictions

     o   Inferences

     o   Theme

     o   Conclusions

     o   Author’s purpose

● Brainstorming

● Organizing

● Paragraph and essay structure:

     o   Narrative

     o   Expository

     o   Persuasive

     o   Research-based

● MLA format, documentation

● Revision, editing – elaborating with:

     o   Word choice

     o   Details

     o   Sentence fluency

● Place value  

● Number sequencing

● Multiplying and dividing numbers

● Adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing fractions and mixed numbers

● Order of operations

● Math properties

● Lines, points, rays

● Angles

● Plane figures

● Coordinate points

● Geometry

● Vertices, edges, faces

● Transformations

● Graphs and data: mean, median, mode

● Time, temperature

● Customary, metric measurement

● Perimeter, area, volume

● Probability

● Circumference

● Symmetry

● Ratio and percent

Life Science – Living Systems  

● Respiratory system

● Circulatory system

● Digestive system

● Excretory system

● Photosynthesis

Physical Science – Chemistry and Matter

● Matter

● Density

● Physical changes

● Mixtures, solutions

● Atoms

● Molecules

● Chemical changes

● Periodic table

● Properties of metals

Earth Science – Solar System and Earth Science

● Sun

● Planets

● Water cycles

● Weather

 

Year A – Florida History  

● State Symbols

● Government

● Geography

● Natives

● Explorers

● Spanish Florida

● English Florida

● Revolution

● Wars (Seminole, Civil, Spanish American)

● World Wars

● Modern Florida

Year B – U.S. History

● Geography

● First Americans

● Exploration

● Settlements

● Colonies

● Revolution: causes, war

● Creating nation

● Early republic

● Expansion

● Civil War: causes, battles, Reconstruction

● The Plains

● Business, industry, cities

● World power

● Current issues

Middle School Curriculum

About Middle School

As students make the transition to middle school, the foundation established in the lower school assures preparation for the challenges ahead.  In addition to traditional courses, character education takes on a new importance in early adolescence.  Instead of merely memorizing  lists of desired character traits, the Good Shepherd approach is to teach, discuss, and model character throughout the day and in every subject and in every activity.  Upon completion of the middle school curriculum, the students have developed academically, physically, socially, and spiritually in such a way that they will be prepared to transfer to their next schools.

6th Grade

The English course sets a foundation for secondary English skills through reading and writing opportunities.  In grammar, students will study the eight parts of speech.  Writing will include descriptive writing, personal narratives, short stories, book reports,, and special projects.

Spelling and vocabulary lessons consist of grade level-appropriate vocabulary for comprehension and grammar in context.  Lessons are designed to address writing skills, including grammar and reading skills.  Lessons consist of definitions, completion of sentences, synonyms, and antonyms, word choice, and vocabulary in context.  Enrichment continues in the form of building upon classical roots, word associations, word families, analogies, and enrichment of vocabulary. 

Math units focus on the four arithmetic operations with whole numbers, positive fractions, positive decimals, and positive and negative integers.  Students learn the concepts of mean, median, and mode, data ratios, and proportions.  Students learn about pi and its formulas.  They solve one-step linear equations.

A note about middle school science and history:

Middle school science and history courses are offered on a three-year rotation due to the small number of middle school students.  Each year, science includes topics from life, earth, and physical science, with the topics and examples rotating.  A specific social studies course is taught each year, rotating through world history, world geography, and American history. 

 

Language Arts Mathematics Science (see narrative) Social Studies
● Parts of speech  

● Writing:

     o   Descriptive

     o   Personal narrative

     o   Short stories

     o   Book reports

     o   Special projects

● Vocabulary

     o   Definitions

     o   Sentence completion

     o   Synonyms

     o   Antonyms

     o   Word choice

     o   Context

     o   Classical roots

     o   Word associations

     o   Word families

     o   Analogies

 

● Arithmetic operations with:      

o   Whole numbers

     o   Positive fraction

     o   Positive decimals

     o   Positive, negative integers

● Mean

● Median

● Mode

● Data ratios

● Proportions

● Pi and its formulas

● One-step linear equations

Earth Science  

● Basic physical science topics

● Matter and interactions

● Changing Earth surface

● Life

● Environment


Life Science

● Cells

● Organs and systems

● Organisms

● Genetics

● Inheritance

● Variation

● Diversity of life

Physical Science

● Elements

● Molecules

● Chemical reactions

● Physics

● Solar system

 

Year A – World History  

● Early civilizations

● Greeks

● Roman Republic

● Roman Empire

● Fall of the empire

● The Middle Ages

● Feudalism

● The Church

● Towns and cities

● Islam

Year B – American History

● Colonization

● Revolution

● Founding documents

● Sectionalism

● Civil War, Reconstruction

● Gilded Age

● Twentieth Century

Year C – World Geography

● Map skills

● Latitude, longitude

● Continents, oceans

● Countries

● Culture

 

7th Grade

The English course builds upon the knowledge learned in 6th grade and pushes students to further application and synthesis of English skills.  Students will write in a variety of modes, including expository, narrative, persuasive, and literary analysis.

Spelling and vocabulary lessons consist of grade level-appropriate vocabulary for comprehension and grammar in context.  Lessons are designed to address writing skills, including grammar and reading skills.  Lessons consist of definitions, completion of sentences, synonyms, and antonyms, word choice, and vocabulary in context.  Enrichment continues in the form of building upon classical roots, word associations, word families, analogies, and enrichment of vocabulary.

Math units focus on algebraic thinking: operations involving rational numbers, use of geometric formulas to determine surface area and volume of various shapes, data, statistics, and probability, as well as ratios, proportions, and percentages.

A note about middle school science and history:

Middle school science and history courses are offered on a three-year rotation due to the small number of middle school students.  Each year, science includes topics from life, earth, and physical science, with the topics and examples rotating.  A specific social studies course is taught each year, rotating through world history, world geography, and American history. 

 

Language Arts Mathematics Science (see narrative) Social Studies
● Writing      

o   Expository

     o   Narrative

     o   Persuasive

     o   Literary analysis

● Vocabulary

     o   Definitions

     o   Sentence completion

     o   Synonyms

     o   Antonyms

     o   Word choice

     o   Context

     o   Classical roots

     o   Word associations

     o   Word families

     o   Analogies

 

● Algebraic thinking  

● Operations with rational numbers

● Geometric formulas for area and volume

● Data

● Statistics, probability

● Ratios

● Proportions

● Percentages

 

Earth Science  

● Basic physical science topics

● Matter and interactions

● Changing Earth surface

● Life

● Environment

Life Science

● Cells

● Organs and systems

● Organisms

● Genetics

● Inheritance

● Variation

● Diversity of life

Physical Science

● Elements

● Molecules

● Chemical reactions

● Physics

● Solar system

Year A – World History  

● Early civilizations

● Greeks

● Roman Republic

● Roman Empire

● Fall of the empire

● The Middle Ages

● Feudalism

● The Church

● Towns and cities

● Islam

Year B – American History

● Colonization

● Revolution

● Founding documents

● Sectionalism

● Civil War, Reconstruction

● Gilded Age

● Twentieth Century

Year C – World Geography

● Map skills

● Latitude, longitude

● Continents, oceans

● Countries

● Culture

8th Grade

The English course builds upon the knowledge learned in 7th grade and pushes students to further application and synthesis of English skills.  Students will develop skills in critical reading, thinking, and oral communication.

Spelling and vocabulary lessons consist of grade level-appropriate vocabulary for comprehension and grammar in context.  Lessons are designed to address writing skills, including grammar and reading skills.  Lessons consist of definitions, completion of sentences, synonyms, and antonyms, word choice, and vocabulary in context.  Enrichment continues in the form of building upon classical roots, word associations, word families, analogies, and enrichment of vocabulary.

The math course is pre-algebra.  (This course is not offered in the 2016-2017 school year.)

A note about middle school science and history:

Middle school science and history courses are offered on a three-year rotation due to the small number of middle school students.  Each year, science includes topics from life, earth, and physical science, with the topics and examples rotating.  A specific social studies course is taught each year, rotating through world history, world geography, and American history. 

 

Language Arts Mathematics Science (see narrative) Social Studies
● Writing      

o   Research skills

     o   Organizing and writing a research paper

     o   MLA citations

     o   MLA works cited pages

● Vocabulary

     o   Definitions

     o   Sentence completion

     o   Synonyms

     o   Antonyms

     o   Word choice

     o   Context

     o   Classical roots

     o   Word associations

     o   Word families

     o   Analogies

 

● Integers  

● Equations

● Factors, fractions

● Rational numbers

● Ratio, proportion, percent

● Equations

● Inequalities

● Functions, graphing

● Real numbers

● Right triangles

● 2-D and 3-D figures

● Statistics

● Probability

● Polynomials

● Nonlinear functions

Earth Science  

● Basic physical science topics

● Matter and interactions

● Changing Earth surface

● Life

● Environment

Life Science

● Cells

● Organs and systems

● Organisms

● Genetics

● Inheritance

● Variation

● Diversity of life

Physical Science

● Elements

● Molecules

● Chemical reactions

● Physics

● Solar system

Year A – World History  

● Early civilizations

● Greeks

● Roman Republic

● Roman Empire

● Fall of the empire

● The Middle Ages

● Feudalism

● The Church

● Towns and cities

● Islam

Year B – American History

● Colonization

● Revolution

● Founding documents

● Sectionalism

● Civil War, Reconstruction

● Gilded Age

● Twentieth Century

Year C – World Geography

● Map skills

● Latitude, longitude

● Continents, oceans

● Countries

● Cult

Fine Arts

The arts at Good Shepherd Episcopal School are an important part of our education in mind, body, and spirit.  Participation in the arts enhances a student’s ability to learn, encourages creativity, builds self-esteem, and increases a student’s appreciation for the beauty which surrounds us.

Each student is given the opportunity to participate in both music and visual art.  Music is offered three days a week, and visual art is offered once a week.  Additional opportunities include singing as an entire school every Friday morning and playing in the string orchestra which meets twice a week.  Individual lessons for strings and piano are also offered.

Music

In music, kindergarten and first grade students begin learning about melody, rhythm, expression, and simple notation.  Students move, sing, play rhythm instruments, and create sound stories.  Students play Musical Mind Games.

Second and third graders continue building on their musical knowledge and skills.  In the second trimester, students begin the study of a string instrument of their choice.  Music Mind Games continue.  Simple part-singing is introduced and music appreciation projects are added.

Fourth and fifth graders, students continue with string instruction as well as general music and music appreciation activities.  They learn beginning ensemble techniques and the more advanced students play in the string ensemble.  Part singing becomes more advanced.  String students have the opportunity to combine instrumental music with singing.

 Middle school students continue to advance in their string instruction.  Music appreciation projects are added to their studies and students sing in three and four part harmony.

All students participate in our Christmas Pageant.  We frequently participate as a school in performances at a local nursing home.  The string ensemble plays annually for the lighting of our local downtown Christmas tree and a variety of other community events.  We have a very active community outreach through our music program.

Visual Art

Visual art stimulates imagination, creativity, and perception.  It changes how one perceives things around us, encourages creative problem solving, and gives one a more complete environmental perspective. 

Students in kindergarten through third grade learn the beginning concepts of art by experiencing many different media such as chalk, water color pastels, etc.  This is frequently referred to as “Playing with Media.”

The older students continue to build on their skills learned in the earlier grades.  Drawing is emphasized.  Instruction is given to slow down the eye, improve eye-hand coordination, improve perception, and paying attention to detail.  Students use mixed media with their drawings.

Students showcase their work by displaying it in the school hallway and in an art show at the end of the school year. 

Other Subjects

Physical Education

All students take physical education two days each week.  (In addition to this class, students stretch and run before school three mornings each week, and recess is provided most days, especially on non-physical education days.)  Younger students develop motor skills and coordination.  All students learn about rule-following and teamwork, with game skills developing through the years.

Foreign Language

The school is committed to offering either a classical or modern world language each year.  The younger students learn the basics: days of week, colors, numbers, etc.  Other conversational terms and expressions are added in subsequent years.  Simple sentences and conversational skills are developed in the middle school years.

Theology

Theology sessions generally involve the reading of a story or scripture passage followed by a discussion, and ending with sacred music.  The discussions are based on three questions: what we learn about God from the story, what we learn about humans from the story, and what the significance and implications are of the story.

Content and discussion topics change from the lower grades to the middle grades but most students are eager to talk of God and, as they get older, become more ready to ask questions of faith and conflict as they see it in their world. Theological reflection helps students to make real some of the attributes of God, like love, care, truth and such that can be found in themselves and in each other.